Happy General John Stark Day– “Live Free or Die”


Battle of Bennington Monument

I started watching historical shows about the American Revolutionary War.  I reason it’s because I’m from New England, not because I’m getting to be that age when one starts watching the History Channel.

The commercials for the “Sons of Liberty’ miniseries really drew me in.   I even started watching the John Adams series on HBO.  Great story, and to think it was true!

Well the 4rth Monday of April is known as General John Stark Day in New Hampshire, it falls on April 27th this year.  Since 2011 this little known state holiday has been celebrated in New Hampshire.  I only bring this up because 2 key battles referenced in the miniseries are the Battle of Bunker Hill, and the Battle of Bennington.   Key battles of the Revolutionary War, and General Stark was instrumental in both.    One of his most famous quotes, and NH’s state motto: “Live Free or Die” is a stark reminder of the conviction and determination that our forefathers bore to bring forth a republic.MonumentWithAViewcrop2


I just gotta get that shot!

I have yet to visit the Bunker Hill Monument, interestingly enough my birth name is Bunker(one day I’ll figure out if there’s a relationship).  The Battle of Bennington Monument was an accidental find.  On one of my mother/daughter weekends I did my usual, “let’s see what’s down this road.”  I go off the planned route and go back roads a lot and only Mom tolerates it.  She loves it when I stop on a dime to jump out and take a picture.

-Just my thoughts.

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Nashua’s Mill Revival


The Mill-yard Smoke Stack – the green at the bottom of this picture is all the crumbled bricks from one of the buildings being razed.

It’s finally happening.  I grew up in Nashua and have always loved the downtown area.  Back in high school (when there was 1), I would take the city bus to the downtown station and walk up Main Street to my part-time job at an eye doctors office on Concord Street.  My stops included the soda counter at Woolworth’s, Espresso Pizza, Alex’s Shoe store (when it was located on East Pearl), and lots of window shopping.

This is the first post on the Nashua mills.  I’ve been taking photos of the mills for a number of years and this will be my outlet for those photos.

-Just my thoughts. -Jenn

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What’s that vacant lot next door to my home?

As both a real estate agent and an appraiser, I look at the entire neighborhood, not just what’s next door.   I can remember a property in Merrimack I was working on at the end of a cul-de-sac.  Nice quiet neighborhood, but through my research you could see the subdivision ends with a couple large lots, one of which is zoned for commercial uses.  It was just under 100 acres with frontage on a main route.

Here's the GIS map of the same area now.

Here’s the GIS map with the zoning overlay of the area now.  The R is residential, the C-2 is commercial area that was in place, but the large commercial building was built after.

Sure enough a few years later a large “box” store opened and you could definitely hear, and “see”, the noise through the neighbors yard.    Can you imagine buying your new home on this quiet cul-de-sac, and then a few years later having this happen?

Cul-de-sac in Merrimack, NH

Cul-de-sac in Merrimack, NH

So here are a few ways you can find out for yourself (if I’m not your agent):

  1. Google maps is the easiest first step.  Zoom in, do the street view (little yellow man icon) and look around.  Of course Google Earth is stunning, A 3D globe.
  2. My favorite is using a GIS viewer you can usually find on a towns website.  Do a search for GIS and the name of the town/municipal location.  GIS stands for Geographic Information Systems and it is an overlay mapping system combing lots, zoning, wetlands, and all sorts of information.  For more information about GIS mapping here’s my previous post on GIS maps in New Hampshire communities.
  3. Online deeds and/or plans.  Here in New Hampshire we have www.NHdeeds.com and you can look up your deed in most counties.  From the deed you can get the subdivision plan # in many cases.  Enter the plan # and you get the subdivision plans.  Really great information!

My point is to look at the surrounding land, the uses.  I can hear my clients say: “but Jenn, we don’t mind that…”

It could be the property is one street over from a major highway, a property with only 2-bedrooms, or industrial zoned land next door, they may not perceive it as a negative.

Key Point:
Do the majority of home buyers see it that way?  I help my clients become informed, for the future marketability of the property.





What is the difference between a Superfund site and a Brownfield?  Check out an earlier post: http://jennifercote.info/superfund-or-brownfield/

Just my thoughts. –Jennifer Cote- Everything Real Estate

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Nashua’s Central Fire Station Repurposed?

Banner Nashua Central Fire Station

How about we do something with this downtown building?

I enjoy taking pictures of interesting buildings. This one was once the Nashua Arts and Science Center. Look at the corbels, the arched window headers, the brick detail on the gable, and what’s with that window air-conditioner? Yikes

I liked the picture so much I used it on my Facebook Page for a while, and started to look into the significance of the 1870 date.

Well, I learned quite a bit of Nashua history in my search, but I’ll focus on this picture. It’s the original Central Fire Station, which is on what’s now known as Church St. I wish it had a better use, looking a bit run down now.

Central Station in Nashua, NH back in time.

The Nashua NH Central Fire Station

Going by the Central Station countless times in the previous 3 decades,  I never noticed the tower on the back left of the building until I saw this picture.  Old fire houses had a bell tower…that was the fire alarm for the neighborhoods around it. Most bell towers have been removed due to structural deterioration. Look at the bell tower in this old postcard photo of Central Station.


Lowell Central Repurposed
Lowell Central Re-purposed


Here’s a good example of a re-purposed fire station in Lowell, MA.  It’s now a restaurant and offices.  Beautiful building from the street.  Notice the bell tower is still there.

You can find a great history of Lowell firefighting:  Lowell Fire Fighting by: J.T.Strunk.  My uncle Gerry was a Captain at this station before it (and he)retired.   I would love to see Nashua do something with the old fire house.

Hmmm, Visualize Nashua?

If you’d like to know when I post another article on this topic “like” my Facebook page: Facebook.com/TopNHhomes

Just my thoughts. -Jenn



Nashua’s Central Station to Close” -11/12/1970 Nashua Telegraph-






Homes of Character in Nashua, Hudson, Hollis, Milford, Merrimack, Pelham, NH Real Estate, Land and Homes, Windham property.

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